Foraging Wild Fruit: Huckleberry

In July and August, wild Blueberries (genus Vaccinium) receive a lot of attention from New Englanders. Long before I'd foraged any other wild food, I used to join my family on a walk to some swampy woods to gather Highbush Blueberries at least once each summer. It's no wonder why: blueberries are delicious, often prolific, and in many instances can be picked for free! And no matter where you live in New England, there's more than one type that can be found.

Closely related to Blueberries (also in the Ericaceae family) are the three species of Huckleberries (genus Gaylussacia), who tend to get less attention from the average wild fruit forager, but I'd argue are no less deserving of appreciation. I've written about Black, Blue, and Dwarf Huckleberry before, and I thought today would be a perfect time to post a reminder about these lesser-known, crunchy-seeded, summertime fruits.

Photo of Black Huckleberry handfulBlack Huckleberry
G. baccata

grows in forests and fields in every state in New England

 
 

Photo of Blue Huckleberry handfulBlue Huckleberry
G. frondosa

grows in similar (though sometimes wetter) habitats in CT, RI, MA, and NH

 

Photo of Dwarf Huckleberry handfulDwarf Huckleberry
G. bigeloviana

grows in bogs and fens in all but VT, though is listed as rare in NH, CT, and RI

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